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Program launched to increase skill sharing opportunities for Australian nurses and midwives

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nurses and midwives

World Youth International are excited to announce the launch of their revised Nurses In Action Kenyan program, which will commence taking place as soon as travel restrictions ease.

The covid-19 outbreak has had a significant impact on World Youth International, as their key business is facilitating immersive and unique international volunteer placements for nurses and other health professionals.

Forced to postpone all volunteer placements, World Youth International have taken advantage of this ‘quiet time’ and reviewed their programs based on data collected from past volunteers and health professionals on the ground in Kenya.

With this data, World Youth International have been able to create a new-look program that
encapsulate the elements that bring the most joy to the volunteers.

But it’s not solely about joy. With the ability to accumulate CPD hours on these programs, World Youth International have explored how they can ensure that volunteers on the program have more opportunities than ever to develop their skills, working alongside local health professionals to inspire change where its most needed.

“When I was on the Nurses In Action program earlier this year, I saw that we can really empower the next generation of nurses by encouraging the sharing of skills and knowledge across cultures. By caring for some of the world’s most vulnerable people in Kenya, alongside Kenyan nurses and midwives, I learnt more than what I could physically give, particularly due to the lack of medical supplies, equipment and facilities. It will be so beneficial for Endorsed  Enrolled Nurses (EEN), Registered Nurses (RN), and Midwives with various levels of experience, to be able to develop their skills even further on these programs. What we can all learn from working within vulnerable communities, and then bringing that first-hand knowledge back home, is vital for the education of future generations of nurses.” said Helen Zahos, Registered Nurse and Nurses In Action Ambassador.

In turn, the sharing of knowledge and skills also empowers the local health professionals within these impoverished communities. According to the World Health Organisation, the world needs 9 million more nurses and midwives if it is to achieve universal health coverage by 2030.

There will be more opportunities than ever for EENs and RNs on the Nurses In Action programs to host educational sessions for the local nurses, particularly student nurses. Local nurses are instrumental in educating their community about health issues, prevention, and care.

Educating nurses and midwives to international standards is a key focus on the Nurses In Action program, aligning with the United Nation’s ‘Sustainable Development Goal 3; ensuring healthy lives and promote well-being for all.

Registered Nurse Katy Condliffe, who has played a crucial role in the development of the Nurses In Action program, strongly believes that her experiences volunteering abroad have shaped her development as a leader within her sector.

That is why it’s crucial that EENs and RNs continue to be empowered and inspired on all Nurses In Action programs. EEN’s will be able to work outside of their scope of practice by being partnered with a RN, and there will be a huge emphasis on education so that all nurses will be contributing at the same level as other team members.

To improve vulnerable communities’ access to health and increase skill sharing opportunities for Nurses, the new-look Nurses In Action program to Kenya will include setting up additional Health Camps in remote villages and expanding the Community Outreach Program.

In conjunction with local health workers, Nurses In Action volunteers will be able to support, assess and treat more patients than ever. There will also be a strong focus on the eradication of Malaria.

More than 250,000 children die from Malaria every year within the African region. World Youth International’s Odede Community Health Centre is one of the first medical facilities in Kenya to roll out a vaccine for children.

Australian nurses participating in the Nurses In Action program will be working closely with local Kenyan health professionals to support this new Malaria vaccination program. Furthermore, World Youth International are committed to increasing the amount of school visits on future programs, so that the children within remote communities can have access to quality health education taught by Australian nurses.

World Youth International have been sending volunteers to Kenya since 1992. They have an impeccable safety and security record with an extensive range of policies in place to ensure all volunteers have an amazing experience overseas and return home safely. Many Nurses want to combine their passion for helping others with their desire to see the world, and choose the Nurses In Action program are they feel more comfortable being with a group.

Volunteers on the Nurses In Action program can continue to enjoy the comfort of knowing that absolutely everything is organised for them while they participate in a diverse range of experiences and placements, all under the guidance and support of an trained Australian team leader.

“World Youth International has sent thousands of volunteers overseas. We are incredibly assionate about the work we do and we welcome health professionals all at various stages of their careers to come on board and join us for an adventure of a lifetime,” said Terry Hoey, General Manager, World Youth International.

“Based on reports coming through from the government, we are confident that our programs will commence again as of March 2021. As the pandemic continues to impact the globe, there are many communities that we have worked within for over 10 years or more who will not be able to recover without our help. Disasters such as this affect us all; but those living in poverty are always the most vulnerable as it makes it even harder for them to break the cycle. If we can’t help these communities gain access to healthcare, who will?” he said.

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